It  is located in the northeastern tip of Puerto Rico, in the municipality of Fajardo. The word which translates as ‘heads’—refers to three head-like rocky promontories that extend from the mainland into the Atlantic Ocean. Although the Conservation Trust of Puerto Rico acquired its 434.59 acres of unique ecological, aesthetic, and historical value in 1975, the location has been recognized for its strategic importance since pre-Columbian times, as suggested by evidence and artifacts found after preliminary archeological excavations. Even though the reserve is located in a somewhat limited area it is an incredibly diverse and scientifically important tract of land. It also has a nice gazebo right at the waters edge, so you can enjoy the view while you wait. They tell you to get there 30 minutes early, which gives you time to relax and enjoy the breezes. The main tour is a two-hour trolley ride that guides you along the reserve with three stops of interest. Among those are the boardwalk trail through a mangrove forest, Playa Lirios, and El Faro de Fajardo. Situated on the highest point of Cape San Juan, the stone building was the second lighthouse erected on the island by the Spanish. Officially lit on May 2, 1882, it has been operating uninterrupted to this day. Inside you’ll find various exhibits related to the lighthouse’s history and surrounding wildlife, as well as an elaborate cast-iron staircase that ascends to the central lantern. The observation deck offers breathtaking views as trade winds gently blow by.

Las Cabezas de San Juan 01

Las Cabezas de San Juan 02

Las Cabezas de San Juan 03